The Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland – No.8

Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland No.8 - 2013The eighth Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland, which was launched today by Dr Malcolm McKibbin, the Head of the Northern Ireland Civil Service and the Permanent Secretary of OFMDFM, features

  • an interview on North-South cooperation with Sir George Quigley;

and articles on:

  • economic relations between Britain and Ireland;
  • the role of impact assessment in supporting cross-border cooperation;
  • the development of archaeology in Ireland, north and south;
  • the Newry-Dundalk ‘twin city’ region;
  • cross-border cooperation between Galicia in NW Spain and northern Portugal; and
  • cross-border cooperation between the community and voluntary sector and other civil society bodies.

It also carries detailed information on all the Centre’s research, training and information activities, as well as those of its associated bodies: the International Centre for Local and Regional Development (ICLRD), the Standing Conference on Teacher Education North and South (SCoTENS) and Universities Ireland.

Download a PDF copy of the Journal pdf icon (5,820Kb)

Briefing Papers

The following Briefing Papers are available in PDF format:

NOTE: These papers originally appeared on the  borderireland.ie website.

You can download a PDF reader from the Adobe website.  Download Adobe Acrobat Reader for PDF files

Delivering a Prosperity Process: Opportunities in North/South Public Service Provision

Download a copy of the report, Delivering a Prosperity Process: Opportunities in North/South Public Service Provision by Michael D'Arcy

Download a copy of the report, Delivering a Prosperity Process: Opportunities in North/South Public Service Provision by Michael D'Arcy

The Centre for Cross Border Studies today publishes a new report proposing a number of areas of public service provision where it makes sense for the Irish and Northern Irish public sectors to cooperate for improved service delivery and ‘value for money’.

Delivering a Prosperity Process: Opportunities in North/South Public Service Provision is by Michael D’Arcy, a Dublin business consultant with a longstanding interest in North/South economic, enterprise and business policy development. His study is based on conversations with senior civil servants, business and academic leaders in both Irish jurisdictions.

The participants in the study identified the following 10 opportunities to begin North/South public service cooperation projects likely to deliver positive results for citizens of the whole island in 10 years time, in 2022.

  1. Policy-makers North and South should outline a joint plan to support employment and economic growth that will particularly target marginalised communities in both jurisdictions.
  2. A cross-border health service provision plan should be outlined as an early imperative.
  3. Creating an all-island Single Energy Market (to take full advantage of renewable wind, wave and biomass) would build on the proven success of the all-island Single Electricity Market.
  4. North/South coordination on ‘treated water’ should be included in the plans for public water infrastructure upgrades in both jurisdictions.
  5. An all-island tourism infrastructure research project should be undertaken to guide future investors in this sector.
  6. The case should be made for a Cross-Border Economic Development Zone in the border region, with strong local involvement being a prerequisite for policy makers to support such an initiative.
  7. The resources of third level institutions in both jurisdictions should be combined in certain high quality courses and knowledge centres.
  8. A Memorandum of Understanding should be concluded to facilitate the joint planning of certain 21st century infrastructure upgrades.
  9. Ireland’s EU presidency in 2013 should be used to showcase the island’s ‘single market’ business achievements.
  10. Civil service managers working on a North/South basis should be facilitated by the provision of a jointly commissioned operational ‘tool box’.

Speaking at the release of the study, author Michael D’Arcy said: “Prosperity, like peace, is a universally shared goal. A ‘Prosperity Process’ based initially on working jointly to improve public services in both parts of Ireland would begin to move the island towards an economic well-being that would benefit all its citizens.”

Further information from:

Michael D’Arcy
Tel: +353 (1) 490 5053
Mobile: +353 (0) 87 2440670
E-mail: michael.darcy@darcysmyth.ie

Cross-Border Economic Renewal: Rethinking Regional Policy in Ireland

Download a copy of CROSS-BORDER ECONOMIC RENEWAL: Rethinking Regional Policy in Ireland by John Bradley and Michael Best, March 2012

Download a copy of CROSS-BORDER ECONOMIC RENEWAL: Rethinking Regional Policy in Ireland by John Bradley and Michael Best, March 2012

The report – Cross-Border Economic Renewal: Rethinking Regional Policy in Ireland – was launched today in Dublin by Aidan Gough, Director of Strategy and Policy at InterTradeIreland. This major study of the economy of the Irish border region and cross-border economic renewal was carried out by Dr John Bradley, formerly of the Economic and Social Research Institute in Dublin, and Professor Michael Best of the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Cambridge University. It covers the origins of Ireland’s two economies (1750-1960); the economic consequence of the NI ‘troubles’; the Belfast Agreement and the island economy; what development strategy frameworks tell us;  the island economy context of the border region;  the border region economy; shopping and producing in the border region (including a range of case studies of successful border region manufacturing firms);  tourism and the border; and a new approach to developing the region – a proposal for a Border Development Zone.

The Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland – No.7

The Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland - No.7

The Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland - No.7

The seventh Journal of Cross Border Studies in Ireland features an interview on North-South cooperation with the Taoiseach, Enda Kenny TD, and articles on young people’s attitudes to cross-border cooperation;  setting up an Economic Development Zone in the border region; North-South research collaboration; cross-border cooperation in hospital services; cross-border undergraduate flows and the contribution of Garret FitzGerald to North-South relations.

Unlocking the Potential of Cross-Border Hospital Planning on the Island of Ireland

A new research report from the Centre for Cross Border Studies concludes that there are potential benefits to be gained from increased North-South cooperation in a number of key acute healthcare services: cystic fibrosis, Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) surgery, paediatric cardiac surgery, orthopaedic surgery and acute mental health services.  

The report, Unlocking the Potential of Cross-Border Hospital Planning on the Island of Ireland, by Shane McQuillan and Vanya Sargent of the consultancy firm Horwath Bastow Charleton, says that while there are significant barriers to the development of cross-border acute health care, these can be ‘worked around’ where it makes sense for improved patient services to do so.  

The report also notes that the new Erne Hospital in Enniskillen ‘presents a significant opportunity for fresh thinking in respect of service provision on a cross-border basis. Particular opportunities may arise in areas such as day-case surgical procedures in orthopaedics, serving patients not just in Fermanagh and Tyrone but also in the surrounding cross-border areas.’  

The Compton Review into health and social care in Northern Ireland, published earlier this week, suggested a number of possible cross-border initiatives, including specialist paediatric services to be provided to Northern patients by Southern hospitals, and patients from the South, particularly along the border, being treated for some cancers in Northern hospitals.  

The Northern Ireland Health Minister,  Mr Edwin Poots MLA, said the Compton Review’s recommendation that Daisy Hill Hospital in Newry should be downgraded could be offset by the Irish Government helping to finance Daisy Hill so that it could ‘extend its services’ to cover the population on both sides of the border. He said he was having ‘conversations’ with the Irish health authorities about this.  

Ms Ruth Taillon, Deputy Director, Centre for Cross Border Studies; Mr Shane McQuillan, Horwath Bastow Charleton; Mr Tom Daly, Secretary General, CAWT; and Ms Vanya Sargent, Horwath Bastow Charleton

Ms Ruth Taillon, Deputy Director, Centre for Cross Border Studies; Mr Shane McQuillan, Horwath Bastow Charleton; Mr Tom Daly, Secretary General, CAWT; and Ms Vanya Sargent, Horwath Bastow Charleton

The report was launched by Mr Tom Daly, Director General of the cross-border health authorities network Cooperation and Working Together (CAWT), on Thursday 15th December 2011 at 12.30 pm in the Europa Hotel in Belfast.  

Download a copy of Unlocking the Potential of Cross-Border Hospital Planning on the Island of Ireland and Appendix D: Data Modelling Tool (Excel version).  

For further information contact:
Ruth Taillon, Deputy Director (Research), Centre for Cross Border Studies
Tel.      028-3751-1550
Mobile  07815-522824
Email:  r.taillon@qub.ac.uk

Impact Assessment Toolkit for Cross-Border Cooperation

Impact Assessment Toolkit for Cross-Border Cooperation

The Centre launched its Impact Assessment Toolkit for Cross-Border Cooperation – developed with the Euro-Institut in Kehl, Germany – at the ‘Cross-Border Training and Impact Assessment in Ireland and Europe’ international conference in Cavan on 28 October 2011.

In the past EU-funded cross-border programme and project promoters have often found it difficult to demonstrate impact: i.e. the changes that have taken place as a result of the activities undertaken. The Impact Assessment Toolkit for Cross-Border Cooperation can help to define and clarify the extent to which the programme or project is likely to contribute to the desired changes. Many problems of Northern Ireland and the Irish border region do not respect jurisdictional boundaries. The toolkit will help to determine whether a cross-border approach is the appropriate level of intervention and, if so, to identify the ‘added value’ of such cooperation.  It will identify whether the proposed activities could have a greater overall impact – socially, economically or environmentally – if undertaken on a cross-border basis than separately within each jurisdiction. For example, will new relationships be built between people or organisations that would not have developed otherwise?  Will the cross-border activities lead to new ways of working or more intensive collaboration that would not have been the case if they had been carried out separately?  Will a cross-border approach be more efficient and/or effective than a single jurisdiction approach?

Download the Impact Assessment Toolkit for Cross-Border Cooperation:

For further details of CCBS training courses in impact assessment contact Ruth Taillon at r.taillon@qub.ac.uk or 0044 (0) 7815 522824.

Teacher Education for Inclusion (2010 SCoTENS annual report)

Primary School Teachers’ experiences of teaching healthy eating within the curriculum (SCoTENS report)

Disablist Bullying: an investigation of student teachers’ knowledge and confidence (SCoTENS report)

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